HumanFirst launches industry’s largest decentralized clinical trial database

October 4, 2022 - 2 minutes
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HumanFirst has launched two new versions of the Atlas platform designed specifically for researchers in industry (AtlasPro) and academia (AtlasEDU).

Atlas was created by HumanFirst to unlock better research for all humans sooner, and has been used for planning and deployment of trustworthy hybrid and at-home clinical trials by 22 of the 25 largest pharmaceutical companies and 23 of the top 50 academic institutions in the world.

AtlasPro includes workflow and infrastructure solutions that give leading pharma and biotech companies access to the most up-to-date, streamlined research across over 10,000 digital measures.

“Every day that a drug is not on the market, pharmaceutical companies can lose an average of $3 million. We created AtlasPro to move the industry forward, increasing trial speed, accessibility and accuracy while helping to save millions of dollars in the process,” said Andy Coravos, CEO and founder of HumanFirst.

About HumanFirst‘s academic research version

AtlasEDU is a free, full-featured version of the Atlas platform customized specifically for academic researchers who qualify.

“We’ve long recognized the benefit Atlas could bring to academic researchers in advancing the use of digital health technologies, and we’ve spent the past several months advancing our algorithms and curation processes so we could support meaningful academic research at no cost to the investigators who move critical medical advancements forward every day,” said Manny Fanarjian, head of applied sciences at HumanFirst.

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Jessilyn Dunn, Assistant Professor and Principal Investigator at Duke, is one such researcher. Dunn leads the Duke Big Ideas Lab and the COVIDENTIFY study, designed to detect COVID-19 using wearable technologies. 

“Access to AtlasEDU will have a tremendous impact in speeding up research, and ensuring we’re using the best-fit technologies for capturing digital measures,” Dunn said. 

“I’m thrilled that academic researchers can now benefit from expanded access to such a comprehensive database.”

Academic researchers and clinicians interested in free use of AtlasEDU can fill out a form to see if they qualify.

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